Unity Of Command: Stalingrad Campaign Download] [Xforce Keygen]

Unity Of Command: Stalingrad Campaign Download] [Xforce Keygen]


Download ->>> DOWNLOAD (Mirror #1)


About This Game

Unity of Command is an innovative and refreshing operational-level wargame that covers the entire 1942/43 Stalingrad Campaign on the Eastern Front. Playable from both the Axis and Soviet perspective, it strives to recreate the strategy, the forces involved and the general tension of that crucial period in World War II.

Experience the highly fluid, enormously large battles of maneuver in a turn-based strategy setting. Take command in this mobile, back-and-forth sort of war where logistics and poor weather are often the decider, and defeat and victory are sometimes just a mile, or a day, apart. 1075eedd30



Title: Unity of Command: Stalingrad Campaign
Genre: Indie, Strategy
Developer:
2x2 Games
Publisher:
2x2 Games
Franchise:
Unity of Command
Release Date: 17 Oct, 2012


Minimum:

  • OS:Windows XP
  • Processor:1.6 GHz
  • Memory:1 GB RAM
  • Hard Drive:150 MB HD space

English




Overall rating: 6\/10

Did you know: If the Wehrmacht had taken all its objectives just in time but had lost all its forces every time during the campaigns the Red Army would have surrendered and the German Reich would have won the war in the east with a brilliant result? You don\u2018t? Me neither but that\u2018s exactly what Unity of Command wants to show you.

UoC is a puzzle game with a WW2 scenario and a supply mechanic. Innovative and refreshing, no doubt, but no strategic wargame. You have only one way to get a desicive or brilliant victory. If you try some other ideas you will fail miserably and can be happy if you still get a normal victory. Even during the campaign the scenarios are not linked. You can lose all your forces while reaching your targets just in time, the next mission you have all units again and you start with new conditions. No impact on the progress, no impact on how to pick out you tactic. Casualities? Yeah...none. It\u2018s ridiculous.

At most scenarios there are one up to three are weak points in the enemy lines. If you don\u2018t break through these points you can not win the scenario. If you\u2018re unlucky and some of your overruns fail you will not get a brilliant victory even if you don\u2018t make any mistakes. If rainy weather appears directly over one of your break through points or your supply spring you can reaload the game without trying. In the end it doesn\u2018t depend on which strategy you chose (because there is only one to succeed the misson) but on the luck of the battle calculations and the weather.

Does UoC make something good? Oh yes, more then you may expected after my little rant.^^
The graphic is quite descent, the art style fits very well to the game concept and the interface is tidy and provides a good overview about all important things. The tutorial is perfect and explains you everything you need to know about the different aspects. All scenarios seems to be historic accurate, as well as the terrain and the behaviour of the AI. The AI is one of the best things about UoC. If you break through the enemy defensive, the AI pulls back, tries to isolate your spearhead units, builds a new defensive frontline and if you let space between your own units, the AI will crush your weak points and cuts you of from supply. The whole dynamic of the scenarios is so well created that it feels like real warfare on the eastern front. With a real strategic concept behind it UoC could have been easly one of the best wargames on the market.

At the moments where the game makes fun and you can enjoy the graphic, the play mechanics and your chosen strategy, UoC can easly reaches a 8\/10. But in its more often, worse moments when you play a scenario for the x-th time and your battle calculations stay unlucky the experience of UoC drops to a low point crawling around a 4\/10.
As a puzzle, WW2 based wargame on a hexfield map with descent graphic, a good art style and a clever acting AI, UoC is a 7\/10 for me. As an overall conclusion with all the points which i mentioned i landed more at a 6\/10 and that means a thumb down. To be clear: UoC is not a bad game. It doesn\u2018t have bugs, it doesn\u2018t lack of interesting ideas or to less content. On the other hand it\u2018s not a real strategy game and for a puzzle game there is way to much RNG and way to less possibilties do beat a scenario. I will play UoC also in the future. For one hour or two it makes quite some fun and i want to beat the scenarios to get brilliant victories. But more then that, no thanks.. Overall rating: 6\/10

Did you know: If the Wehrmacht had taken all its objectives just in time but had lost all its forces every time during the campaigns the Red Army would have surrendered and the German Reich would have won the war in the east with a brilliant result? You don\u2018t? Me neither but that\u2018s exactly what Unity of Command wants to show you.

UoC is a puzzle game with a WW2 scenario and a supply mechanic. Innovative and refreshing, no doubt, but no strategic wargame. You have only one way to get a desicive or brilliant victory. If you try some other ideas you will fail miserably and can be happy if you still get a normal victory. Even during the campaign the scenarios are not linked. You can lose all your forces while reaching your targets just in time, the next mission you have all units again and you start with new conditions. No impact on the progress, no impact on how to pick out you tactic. Casualities? Yeah...none. It\u2018s ridiculous.

At most scenarios there are one up to three are weak points in the enemy lines. If you don\u2018t break through these points you can not win the scenario. If you\u2018re unlucky and some of your overruns fail you will not get a brilliant victory even if you don\u2018t make any mistakes. If rainy weather appears directly over one of your break through points or your supply spring you can reaload the game without trying. In the end it doesn\u2018t depend on which strategy you chose (because there is only one to succeed the misson) but on the luck of the battle calculations and the weather.

Does UoC make something good? Oh yes, more then you may expected after my little rant.^^
The graphic is quite descent, the art style fits very well to the game concept and the interface is tidy and provides a good overview about all important things. The tutorial is perfect and explains you everything you need to know about the different aspects. All scenarios seems to be historic accurate, as well as the terrain and the behaviour of the AI. The AI is one of the best things about UoC. If you break through the enemy defensive, the AI pulls back, tries to isolate your spearhead units, builds a new defensive frontline and if you let space between your own units, the AI will crush your weak points and cuts you of from supply. The whole dynamic of the scenarios is so well created that it feels like real warfare on the eastern front. With a real strategic concept behind it UoC could have been easly one of the best wargames on the market.

At the moments where the game makes fun and you can enjoy the graphic, the play mechanics and your chosen strategy, UoC can easly reaches a 8\/10. But in its more often, worse moments when you play a scenario for the x-th time and your battle calculations stay unlucky the experience of UoC drops to a low point crawling around a 4\/10.
As a puzzle, WW2 based wargame on a hexfield map with descent graphic, a good art style and a clever acting AI, UoC is a 7\/10 for me. As an overall conclusion with all the points which i mentioned i landed more at a 6\/10 and that means a thumb down. To be clear: UoC is not a bad game. It doesn\u2018t have bugs, it doesn\u2018t lack of interesting ideas or to less content. On the other hand it\u2018s not a real strategy game and for a puzzle game there is way to much RNG and way to less possibilties do beat a scenario. I will play UoC also in the future. For one hour or two it makes quite some fun and i want to beat the scenarios to get brilliant victories. But more then that, no thanks.. Overall rating: 6\/10

Did you know: If the Wehrmacht had taken all its objectives just in time but had lost all its forces every time during the campaigns the Red Army would have surrendered and the German Reich would have won the war in the east with a brilliant result? You don\u2018t? Me neither but that\u2018s exactly what Unity of Command wants to show you.

UoC is a puzzle game with a WW2 scenario and a supply mechanic. Innovative and refreshing, no doubt, but no strategic wargame. You have only one way to get a desicive or brilliant victory. If you try some other ideas you will fail miserably and can be happy if you still get a normal victory. Even during the campaign the scenarios are not linked. You can lose all your forces while reaching your targets just in time, the next mission you have all units again and you start with new conditions. No impact on the progress, no impact on how to pick out you tactic. Casualities? Yeah...none. It\u2018s ridiculous.

At most scenarios there are one up to three are weak points in the enemy lines. If you don\u2018t break through these points you can not win the scenario. If you\u2018re unlucky and some of your overruns fail you will not get a brilliant victory even if you don\u2018t make any mistakes. If rainy weather appears directly over one of your break through points or your supply spring you can reaload the game without trying. In the end it doesn\u2018t depend on which strategy you chose (because there is only one to succeed the misson) but on the luck of the battle calculations and the weather.

Does UoC make something good? Oh yes, more then you may expected after my little rant.^^
The graphic is quite descent, the art style fits very well to the game concept and the interface is tidy and provides a good overview about all important things. The tutorial is perfect and explains you everything you need to know about the different aspects. All scenarios seems to be historic accurate, as well as the terrain and the behaviour of the AI. The AI is one of the best things about UoC. If you break through the enemy defensive, the AI pulls back, tries to isolate your spearhead units, builds a new defensive frontline and if you let space between your own units, the AI will crush your weak points and cuts you of from supply. The whole dynamic of the scenarios is so well created that it feels like real warfare on the eastern front. With a real strategic concept behind it UoC could have been easly one of the best wargames on the market.

At the moments where the game makes fun and you can enjoy the graphic, the play mechanics and your chosen strategy, UoC can easly reaches a 8\/10. But in its more often, worse moments when you play a scenario for the x-th time and your battle calculations stay unlucky the experience of UoC drops to a low point crawling around a 4\/10.
As a puzzle, WW2 based wargame on a hexfield map with descent graphic, a good art style and a clever acting AI, UoC is a 7\/10 for me. As an overall conclusion with all the points which i mentioned i landed more at a 6\/10 and that means a thumb down. To be clear: UoC is not a bad game. It doesn\u2018t have bugs, it doesn\u2018t lack of interesting ideas or to less content. On the other hand it\u2018s not a real strategy game and for a puzzle game there is way to much RNG and way to less possibilties do beat a scenario. I will play UoC also in the future. For one hour or two it makes quite some fun and i want to beat the scenarios to get brilliant victories. But more then that, no thanks.


UoCII Developer Diary 22 – Halted at Metz:

September 1944. Hitler’s armies are retreating in disorder after their defeat in the Normandy hedgerows. The Allies keep up the chase across France, but General George Patton’s 3rd US Army is beset by supply difficulties. The Germans finally manage to re-establish a defensive line around the heavily fortified medieval city of Metz. According to orders issued by Hitler, fortress commanders are to hold this position at all costs…

Encouraged by good feedback from our previous post, we decided to start on a series of short trailers about our game mechanics, old and new. The story starts with the 3rd Army actions following the long and bloody stalemate at Metz. It is through a series of coincidences that we are again going on about stragglers (sorry!) but I hope the trailer is worth it for everybody. There is also a lengthy development update at the end of the post, as usual.

Halted at Metz. Unity of Command II is officially announced:

It’s no secret that we’ve been working hard for many years on our second game. Today we’re happy to officially announce that Unity of Command II is coming in Q3 2019.

Steam store page went live today and we’ll be sharing more details on the brand new engine, game mechanics, and eye candy there, as development progresses. Check out the announcement trailer and new screenshots here:
https://store.steampowered.com/app/809230/Unity_of_Command_II/

This is a big day for us and we’d like to thank all wargamers and fans of UoC who supported us. You gave us courage to soldier on with this project! The best is yet to come and we can’t wait to show you the full game. Please support us by wishlisting the game!. En Route to Rouen:


August 1944: after months of hard fighting, the Allies are finally out of Normandy. In front of them, the Wehrmacht has all but disintegrated, having stood its ground up until the breaking point. Supply is now the biggest concern for the Allies. Taking the large port of Antwerp will allow them to freely operate their vast armies and air forces in months to come.

Now that the game has been officially announced, I’ve decided to change the post format for this diary a little. Previously, I focused heavily on what we were doing internally. I was giving a lot of technical info, and even airing our own doubts if the project was going to get completed at all. Big thanks to all who’ve had the patience to bear with these “developer confessions”. The new format should be much more player oriented. We will be going through concrete examples of play, the historical context, and how the game mechanics tie everything together. I hope you enjoy it!

If you’ve been reading our previous developer diaries, you’re likely already familiar with some of the key new features in Unity of Command II, like fog of war, HQ intel, and stragglers. Today we’ll show how these new features tie together to form a tight little gameplay loop, that gives an entirely new dimension to the game.

The Route Ahead. Unity of Command 2 Development Diaries:
Hello and welcome to Unity of Command 2 Development Diaries!

We’ll be posting a brand new Development Diary #19 shortly, here on Steam’s announcement section, but here’s a short recap in case you missed any of the previous entries.

While it’s true that Unity of Command 2 hasn’t been properly announced it’s no secret that we’ve been working on the game and, in fact, have been at it for quite some time.

The sequel is on its way, we confirmed that much in this Anniversary post[unityofcommand.net] in the Blogs section on Unity of Command web quite some time ago.

The very first Development Diary (‘No More Wipeouts![unityofcommand.net]') was published just a couple of months later and can give you an idea of what to expect from the upgraded mechanics, while the second diary entry (Objectives[unityofcommand.net]) weights the pros and cons of timed objectives in the game (spoiler alert: it looks like we’re keeping those).

Excellent reads, both of those, but Tom, our Project Lead on UoC2, has set a high standard for himself and decided to start from scratch. “I’m restarting the dev diary series” announced Tom and then proceeded to explain the envisioned changes to the losses management system in both a scenario and a campaign. The third diary entry (Are You Experienced?[unityofcommand.net]) also hints at tweaks to the familiar veterancy levels and mentions upgrades between scenarios for the very first time!

A brand new feature, headquarters, was announced and explained in Report to HQ, ASAP![unityofcommand.net], while The Supply Network[unityofcommand.net] and Move it, Soldier![unityofcommand.net] shed some light on the refining process of the defining mechanics in Unity of Command; planned changes to supply logistics, fighting and maneuvering are detailed in Dev Diaries 5 to 7.

Campaign[unityofcommand.net] drops the bomb with the first ever Art Preview, but the excitement doesn’t stop there as Tom announces the switch to a brand new in-house 3D engine built on Python while staying recognizably Unity of Command. Developer Diary 9 (Map Making[unityofcommand.net]) takes the next logical step and explains the process of map building, apparently a tedious task with a very limited room for automation. We use the word ‘shader’ for the very first time, marking a new chapter in the development of Development Diaries.

Performance[unityofcommand.net] diary answers the age-old question - will this game run on my age-old PC? - with a resounding ‘probably yes!’ but please don’t tell that to anyone just yet as we’re still tweaking things in hopes of making the game look even better and running on lower spec hardware. Oh, and if you read the comments section in Dev Diary 10, there’s also a brief mention of planned additional content for the game which is a politically correct way of saying yes, there will be DLCs!

A rather novel game development technique was introduced last year in the Summer of Systems[unityofcommand.net]: the team decided to ditch any low-level system that wasn’t implemented by the end of August. Good news: team crunched and ended up implementing most of the planned systems. Steam release is casually confirmed.

An open invitation to modders was sent out in So over with Under-The-Hood[unityofcommand.net], a Dev Diary 13 that also publishes a new screenshot, describing an interesting problem: the units were drowning in the terrain, which is kind of a point of military uniforms, but apparently not really good for gameplay. The solution? You’ll have to read to blog, unfortunately.

Alternatively, you could start browsing through Dev Diaries 14 -17 that namely discuss new features like The Fog of War[unityofcommand.net], Intel system or the weather modifiers, but truth be told are just excuses for the team to show off a bunch of new visuals: while the subtleties of screen space ambient occlusion are hard to notice, the Unity of Command 2 is starting to look just plain gorgeous! Case in point - this Trick or Treat[unityofcommand.net] screenshot.

TL; DR
Not bad for a game that hasn’t even been properly announced, eh? If you read between the lines, we’ve spilled the beans on pretty much all major improvements to gameplay, explained the reasoning behind new features and even gave a hint to the release date - check out the brand new Dev Diary #19[unityofcommand.net].

The work continues!. UoC2 Developer Diary 19 – Details, Details:


By now, a lot of the people following this diary must be thinking “so anyway, this game is practically done, right?”

I guess it depends on your definition of “practically”. It is certainly playable, there are very few features that are outright missing, and the scenario count is up to around 20-ish. On the other hand, we’re trying to make a game that’s better than merely playable, so expect more diaries from me until we’re judged release-ready.

As an example, the deformed Union Jack in the picture is not an attempt at cheeky political commentary, it’s actually what we need to do to make the flag readable in its wavy shape. I was not even aware of this process until Goran, our lead artist, showed me how we do this for almost every flag in the game.

It’s a good illustration, I think, of the type of detailing work that we’re doing right now. We take the game to be mechanically solid, and we’re making rule changes only exceptionally. Our current focus is on the (many!) details that make up the flow and feeling of the game. Eventually, the plan is for the final round of scenario and balancing work to be done on a near-finalized, comfortably playable version of the game.

Visitas: 2

Comentar

¡Necesitas ser un miembro de Mahina Taka-Taka Georgia Residencial para añadir comentarios!

Participar en Mahina Taka-Taka Georgia Residencial

Sobre



DESDE ISLA DE PASCUA MAGDALENA NOVOA V.Los primeros quince días de febrero se celebra la Tapati en Isla de Pascua, una fiesta que muchos no conocen, y que representa una de las mayores expresiones culturales de la Polinesia.Desde hace más de cuarenta años este encuentro reúne a los pascuenses tras un objetivo: revivir sus antiguas tradiciones y transmitirlas a los más jóvenes, mediante competencias destinadas a elegir a la reina del año entre las familias participantes. Los turistas se sorprenden al ver la capacidad de organización de los Rapa Nui, que dedican, durante meses, su tiempo libre a concretar con éxito las más de 50 pruebas ancestrales que conforman esta festividad.De día, diversos rincones de la Isla reciben al público y a los concursantes que participan en competencias como la triatlón rapa nui -carrera con cuelgas de plátano, posta y canotaje- que se mezcla con expresiones artísticas, como tallado en piedra y madera, confección de collares de conchas y coronas de flores, entre otras. Y, a las 21:45 horas, el escenario, ubicado en Hanga Roa, decorado este año con pinturas inspiradas en la leyenda del hombre pájaro, llena de color la noche, mientras que la música y los bailes, interpretados por los clanes participantes, animan a los más de 4.000 asistentes, entre rapa nui y turistas.La Tapati es una fiesta hecha por y para los pascuenses, una enciclopedia de su historia relatada en Rapa Nui, y si bien el idioma priva a los visitantes de conocer el secreto que encierran las letras de las canciones o el tema de las obras, resalta el misticismo de una Isla que, por siglos, ha cautivado a quienes se han aventurado a cruzar 3.700 kilómetros por el Océano Pacífico y vivir una experiencia inolvidable en el ombligo del mundo.

=""/>

Miembros

Última actividad

Entradas de blog publicadas por stanley
Hace 3 horas
Entradas de blog publicadas por rcreddy vallapu
Hace 4 horas
boss ha publicado un estado
Hace 10 horas
Entrada de blog publicada por boss

Tiger king Joe Exotic T Shirt

Official Tiger king Joe Exotic T Shirt, Tiger king Joe Exotic T Shirts, Tiger king Joe Exotic Shirt, Tiger king Joe Exotic Shirts. Tiger king Joe Exotic Merch.https://teespring.com/stores/tiger-king-joe-exotic-t-shirthttps://teespring.com/stores/tiger-king-joe-exotic-t-shirt…Ver más
Hace 10 horas
Entradas de blog publicadas por rcreddy vallapu
ayer
Entradas de blog publicadas por stanley
Martes
boss ha publicado un estado
Martes
Entradas de blog publicadas por boss
Martes
boss ha publicado un estado
Martes
Entradas de blog publicadas por rcreddy vallapu
Lunes
Entrada de blog publicada por stanley

Why Buying Domains Can Be Strategic

Strategic domain registration is something every business needs to understand.Approaching domain registrations from a strategic perspective can open up opportunities for success in earnings and search traffic.This is a reasonable approach that does far more merely protecting a brand.Defensive domain registration is the act of buying different versions of a website’s domain name in order to block competitors from obtaining them.The goals for defensive domain registrations are limited.By…Ver más
3 Abr
Entrada de blog publicada por rcreddy vallapu
3 Abr
boss ha publicado un estado
2 Abr
Entrada de blog publicada por boss

The Tiger King Joe Merch

The Tiger King Joe Merch, The Tiger King Joe T Shirt,The Tiger King Joe T Shirts, The Tiger King Joe Shirt, The Tiger King Joe Shirtshttps://teespring.com/stores/the-tiger-king-joe-merchhttps://teespring.com/stores/the-tiger-king-joe-merch…Ver más
2 Abr
Entrada de blog publicada por stanley

Ways You Should Do Marketing Differently Today

I think we can all agree that it’s been a crazy couple of weeks, courtesy of COVID-19.Every day, we face a new reality, adjusting the way we live and work, walking the line between precaution and panic.Tensions rise along with the number of Coronavirus cases reported in the news.We stock up on groceries, make sure that our loved ones are safe, and overhaul our daily routines.We follow all the guidelines and hope to settle into a new normal.And that’s when entirely new fears seize us.As if all…Ver más
1 Abr
Entradas de blog publicadas por rcreddy vallapu
1 Abr

© 2020   Creado por Angelica Costa Correa.   Tecnología de

Reportar un problema  |  Términos de servicio